Monday, April 24, 2017

T is for Tennessee

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



I got these blocks made in January so as to be ahead of the game come the challenge. Originally I was just going to make 8 or 9 but got on a roll and boom.. they were all done. I made one, took a picture, put it up on the design wall with the others, in order. Usually I would choose them from the list of blocks that I had sorted through and selected back in 2016 when I first decided that I would do this for the blog challenge this year. But sometimes I would go back to Quilter's Cache and check out some other blocks and sometimes select one of those. And sometimes I wouldn't copy the one that I chose to my list. 

That is what happened with this block. And when I came to write the blog I couldn't find the name of it. I tried to go through the list of blocks under T on Quilter's Cache but I couldn't see it. I decided that I must have gotten out of order, gotten confused and skipped T and made either 2 S blocks or 2 U blocks but I couldn't find it there either. 

Finally I went to my Brain's Trust ie my Twilter Group on Facebook and lamented my problem there, along with a photo and Vicki, From the blog and podcast My Creative Corner 3 tracked it down on Quilter's Cache. It does indeed start with T. In my panic I must have skipped over that block and not checked it out. Thank you so much Vicki!

So here it is Tennessee, which can be found on Quilter's Cache here (it really can even if I couldn't see for looking). Its  traditional block and is described as a great stash busting block as the whole block is made up of half square triangles, one side common and the others of varying colours and with different coloured squares in 2 corners. Completely scrappy and totally gorgeous.




I loved the pictures and diagrams I saw on Quilter's Cache of a whole quilt made from the block - some awesome secondary patterns developing and a wonderful block for using up scraps. 


Today is the 20th day of the challenge and T sees the completion of the 4th row of the A to Z quilt. Here is what we have so far



Saturday, April 22, 2017

S is for Sailboat

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



Sailboat is another pattern from Quilter's Cache and can be found here It is listed as a traditional pattern and an internet search turned up a lot of patterns called Sailboat, or a variation of it. And there were lots of different ones. I didn't see the version from Quilter's Cache turn up else where but there were a number of similar themed ones. The Quilter's Cache version was an "on point" version. 

This was the more common version to be found




or variations of it such as this one


All of the version used a combination of half square triangles and squares to complete the design.

I wasn't overly happy with the way mine turned out... it was very bland and doesn't show up well in the photograph which was a bit washed out.


The version shown on Quilter's Cache was very dramatic when put together in a table runner and would be very striking in a whole quilt



Friday, April 21, 2017

R is for Red Cross

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



Red Cross is a traditional quilt block, which has a number of variations on the same theme. There are also a lot of blocks that are called Red Cross which are very different from each other. Being the name of a famous organisation a number of blocks have been named in its honour (I presume). They are usually self descriptive, ie a block that has a red cross in it! The pattern I used came from Quilters Cache here .

I found one very similar to it on Jenny Beyer's website here. It used mitred corners in it (I avoid this particular technique as I haven't really mastered it)



This is mine. Just to be a rebel I didn't make it in red!



The whole quilt made from the red cross quilt block looked really boring to me. The overall design  achieved could have been as easily achieved by cutting strips and squares. I thought it was nothing and certainly won't be going onto my must do list 





Thursday, April 20, 2017

Q is for Quatrefoils

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



I hadn't heard of this block before choosing it for this challenge however it is marked in the Quilters Cache as being a traditional block and when doing a web search I found a number of articles about it and a YouTube video on making it. I found someone's pinterest board on the block here.  



The pattern for this block can be found on Quillter's Cache here The pattern is for a 9" block but I wanted a 12" block so increased the sizes of the units I cut. Instead of 2" squares I cut 2.5" and instead of 3.5" squares I cut 4.5" squares.




This is the youtube video for making the block.

Here's a diagram of a  quilt made using the quatrefoil block

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

P is for Peace and Plenty


This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.






Once again the pattern for this block comes from Quilter's Cache and can be found here. It's centre is a pinwheel, one of my favourite block units. Its probably the kid in me. I always loved pinwheels! In a quilt block I love the sense of movement that a pinwheel can create. The whole block is made up of half square triangles - 16 of them in all. - 4 for the pinwheels and 12 for the flying geese units and side units. It would be possible to make the flying geese looking units as flying geese rather than 2 half square triangles but it would use more fabric. 




An internet search found lots of examples of the block in a variety of fabric





I wasn't able to find any examples of quilts made apart from diagram on Quilt Cache. I actually don't like it. Its very messy when put together in the quilt. I feel it is a block that looks great in sample quilt or sashed blocks but not so great on its own



Tuesday, April 18, 2017

O is for Ohio Star

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.




My E block was the Eight Pointed Star and when blogging about it I discussed the fact that there are lots and lots of Star blocks. The most famous/common/popular/well known - call it what you will - is the Ohio Star. It is certainly one of the first blocks I learned about. 

Another traditional and very popular block the pattern for which can be found here on Quilter's Cache. 


There is a YouTube video of how to make the block here on Missouri Star Quilt Company. Its a great resource



The photo isn't showing the colours I used too well. Its actually 2 shades of green with a white centre with multicoloured dots on it.



The Quilt Cache had this setting for the quilt - the Ohio Star block set with snowball blocks.


These are some other examples of Ohio Star quilts that are but a few that I found on the web









Today is the 15th day of the challenge and O sees the completion of another row of my A to Z quilt. This is what we have so far


Monday, April 17, 2017

N is for Next Door Neighbour


This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



The Next Door Neighbor block is a traditional  block from the time of the civil war. According to Barbara Brackman on the website Civil War Quilts it was named by the Ladies' Art Company of St Louis in the early 20th Century. I found a number of websites that had tutorials for making this block. 

Next Door Neighbour was chosen from Quilter's Cache. The pattern can be found here . I chose it because it would end up the right size.



A quilt made from the blocks has a secondary pattern which I find gorgeous. A quilt from this block alone would be wonderful... a sort of basket weave affect


Saturday, April 15, 2017

M is for Michigan

This month I'm participating in A to Z Challenge, where 100's of bloggers around the world challenge themselves to write every day for the month of April, working their way through the alphabet.  I'm sewing a patchwork block for each letter of the alphabet. Each day I will share that block and a little about the block and direct you to where you can find a tutorial for that block on the Web.



 Today block is Michigan, one of a number of blocks names after states in the USA.
This block identified on Quilter's Cache here as being a traditional block however I haven't been able to find it anywhere else on the internet.

I have found quite a number of other blocks with Michigan in their title which are all very different to this one.







Michigan is a variation of a string block. I love string blocks. They are so colourful and such a great way of using up scraps of fabric, long skinny ones that are too thin to be used in my regular piecing.

This one was paper pieced and so all the strings are the same width. In the past I have made them with various width string pieces. In my stash using system I class a string as any piece of fabric narrower than 1.5" and longer than... well probably 3" but usually 8".



My most recent string block quilt is one I called Stringen Em Along which was from a Bonnie Hunter pattern called String X. Instead of a paper block on which it was paper pieced I used a rectangle of fabric, some thin cotton from a worn out sheet. After I had sewn the strips on, the rectangles were cut to shape and then the side triangles sewn on to make the string part of it go diagonally. 


I have made it for our Japanese Grand daughter (the daughter of our host son Sho - the nearest thing I have to a grandchild). We are taking it with us to give to her when we see her in July.

This photo comes with a bonus picture of our dog Jack.

Like Michigan, each "block" consisted of 4 units (all the same) put together with great effect.

Michigan would make a very dramatic quilt too.